To a Skylark: A poem by Shelley, chanted by Remesh Chandran (Video, 17 mins)

LD: This hypnotic video poem by the poet Shelley, chanted by an Indian admirer, can be listened to several times as a substitute for meditation. Most listeners without an ear for poetry might be tempted to click off after the first 30 seconds, partly because of the performer’s bizarre Indian accent. Let them persist and the cumulative effect of this incantantory recitation will induce in the receptive listener an altered state of consciousness . I cannot praise this gem of recitation too highly. 

VIDEO  :  17 mins

Like this? Share it now.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on RedditShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someonePrint this page

22 thoughts on “To a Skylark: A poem by Shelley, chanted by Remesh Chandran (Video, 17 mins)

  1. this is not some bizarre accent but sounds to my untrained ear as the authentic prayer rhythm, heard it many times in india (local temples go at it early, like 5 am, starts with little tinkles then recitation), sort of like this, either way, focusing on words is wrong, it all becomes yammering.

    you can turn on both videos in separate tabs and hear how the rhythms merge.

    1. Thanks for the video, Lobro. Haven’t watch it all yet because it’s long, but will watch a bit more now. Lovely pictures and evocative meditational music. Truly uplifting. I now know where this man who recited the Shelley poem is coming from.

      1. I was sent into, “induced” into, an altered state of annoyance by the Indian accent. How anyone can listen to 16 minutes of it is beyond me. I guess there’s various states of annoyance. Darkmoon is annoying in one way, this video is annoying in another way. I guess that’s called “Harmony” and “Balance” and “Yin Yang” or something like that.

        The French “Alouette” song about The Skylark is not at all annoying and is alot more ¡FUN! to listen to :

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X36_5JYt8yY

    2. Long live India!

      Listening to 17 minutes of this poem recited by Remesh Chandran in his pronounced Indian accent is not everyone’s cup of tea! In a sense Joe is right, this has to be an acquired taste! 🙂

      LD must be a very strange lady indeed to go into a hypnotic trance listening to 17 minutes of this, with the each verse recited twice.

      However, I’ll say this. I’ve sat through the full 17-minute performance twice, and the second time it got better. I took my blood pressure after each performance and it was much lower the second time. WOW!

      Joe’s “Alouette” video didn’t lower my blood pressure at all. It only made it go UP!

      Every poem you read, every bit of music you listen to, every thought you have, influences the neurons in your brain and sets them dancing. Blood pressure is influenced. Adrenalin can be controlled. Serotonin levels can be increased.

      The right thoughts can decrease stress levels. And vice versa, the wrong thoughts can increase stress, leading to all sorts of medical problems.

  2. Every morning, to start the day.
    GOVINDAM ADI PURSHAM

    I worship Govinda, the primeval Lord, who is adept in playing on His flute,
    with blooming eyes like lotus petals,
    His head decked with peacock feathers,
    the figure of beauty tinged with the hue of blue clouds,
    His unique loveliness charming millions of cupids.

  3. LD:

    “This hypnotic video poem by the poet Shelley, chanted by an Indian admirer, can be listened to several times as a substitute for meditation. Most listeners without an ear for poetry might be tempted to click off after the first 30 seconds, partly because of the performer’s bizarre Indian accent. Let them persist and the cumulative effect of this incantantory recitation will induce in the receptive listener an altered state of consciousness . I cannot praise this gem of recitation too highly.”

    Thanks for sharing.

    I listened for 10 minutes. It was interesting. It could be hypnotic to many. Not to me.

    I have been a part of numerous hypnotic sessions over the years. I have found that women are more easily hypnotized than men. I was always willing… but could never be hypnotized. Not even in my 20s.

    I guess I have always been too ‘mule-headed’ to fall victim. 😉

    1. Pat,
      Meditation is not hypnosis. In Theravada Buddhism there are 3 main types, Samati, or concentration meditation, Vipassana, or awareness meditation, and Maranasati, or death meditation. Begin with Samati, or Anapanasati. It’s fixing your mind at one point at the nostrils and just following the breath, in and out. No trance, no magic, no mumbo jumbo. It sounds easy, but you’ll find your mind is like a monkey dancing around a stick. When you find the mind wandering, examine the thought, let it go and return gently to following the breath. There are a lot of health benefits as well.

      1. Felix –

        Thanks! I really appreciate your concern.

        I correctly responded in that manner in reply to this quote, which you obviously missed:

        “This HYPNOTIC video poem by the poet Shelley, chanted by an Indian admirer..”

        You might want to direct your reply more to the one who wrote that…. 🙂

      2. Felix –

        I’d like very much to learn those meditation techniques you mention. 🙂
        They would probably help mend much damage caused by stress…

      3. Hi Gilbert,
        Yes, you are correct! May I suggest you go to archive.org and sign up as a member! It’s free as are any downloads you make. There are a plethora of audio courses and books on Anapanasati, mindfulness with breathing. They’ll probably tell you to sit in the Lotus or half lotus position, but that’s not necessary. You can sit in a chair with your back straight, don’t slouch but stay relaxed. Let go and just concentrate at one point at the nostrils and just follow your breath as it passes them, in and out. When the mind wanders just go gently back to following the breath. Don’t force yourself. It’s important to be relaxed at all times. Above all don’t get angry with yourself. Observe the thought and let go.
        Anapanasati is quite safe it’s learning to think what you want to think, not what your mind wants to think!
        Regard it as quality time spent alone with your best friend you’ll have for all eternity, YOU.

  4. I don’t know if Shelley knew “The world’s thy ship and not thy Home” as his ship was sinking just as it was close to entering The Heavenly Haven Port of La Spezia and he drowned [ off the coast of Lerici, Italy ]. He was a pre-cursor to today’s modern day Whites, he was an atheist.

  5. It is better to read along the verses with the recitation, then meditate while listening a second time. I doubt Shelly had such a recital in mind when he penned this, but I imagine he would have been honored to have heard it chanted this way. I find the same as Sardonicus – it lowers blood pressure! 🙂

  6. Meditation can feel wonderful followed by physical benefits such as relaxation, lowered blood pressure, removal of stress. But, it can lead to an altered-state of consciousness in the mind which may lead to dark forces leading one away from the Good light within us. Depending on the recipient of the dark forces, it may be presented as good when it is not.

    I would say, proceed with caution. A direct prayer to Father in Heaven is a safer practice.

    1. NS –

      Good points.

      Jesus was said to have told folks to pray in a closet in private…. and did not tell them to “go mediate in a closet.”

    2. NS
      What was Jesus doing wandering for 40 days in the desert? He was fasting and meditating. JAH truth the cult to which you belong have led you astray, NS. Read Thomas Merton’s books on the desert fathers. Also study the Jesus Prayer of the Hesychasts. The Protestants aren’t real Christians. Most of them are Jew worshipping hysterics. I can assure NS, meditation is very much part of real Christian practice and tradition. Even the Hebrews meditated!
      Psalm 19 verse 14. “Let the words of my mouth, and the MEDITATION of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O Lord, my strength, and my redeemer.”
      NS, you will never know God, unless you become pure in heart, and you won’t purify your heart unless you meditate.

  7. What is Brahmin? By consulting the dictionary we find two, seemingly very different, meanings:

    (1) a member of the highest priestly caste in India;
    (2) a socially or culturally superior person, especially a member of the upper classes from New England.

    Are these two definitions related somehow? What is DNA genealogy; is it a science or a pseudoscience? What are haplogroups and haplotypes? What are the haplogroups for the Brahmins, the Anglo-Saxons, the ethnic Russians, the Jews, the Georgians, the Circassians and all other ethnic groups on the Earth?

    Are the Brahmins, the Anglo-Saxons and the ethnic Russians relate somehow? If they are, who are closer to the Brahmins – the Anglo-Saxons or the ethnic Russians?

    Anatole Klyosov – former Harvard professor and the founder of DNA genealogy (a.k.a Molecular chronology of human history) – asserts that these and many other interesting questions can be answered scientifically.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatole_Klyosov

    Klyosov has written many papers and dozen books on the subject. Two years ago he founded Academy of DNA genealogy. According to the experimental data gathered and analyzed by Klyosov and his many disciples all over the world:

    The Brahmins, the Anglo-Saxons, the ethnic Russians belong to the haplogroup R1;
    Georgians, Ossetians, Circassians (and West Caucasus tribes in general) – to haplogroup G2;
    Jews – to haplogroup J2.

    http://jogg.info/pages/52/files/Klyosov1.pdf

    1. Circassian :

      I bet you think the “G” in your “G2” haplogroup stands for “Genius”, don’t you? 🙂

      1. Pretty close, Joe. You guessed it, rascal 🙂

        Still, I would prefer to think that the “G” in my “G2” haplogroup stands for “Genuine”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *