The Secret Teachings [*POEM*]

Christian martyrs about to be eaten alive by lions 
in the reign of the Emperor Nero (54-68 AD).

THE  SECRET  TEACHINGS

by Xanadu

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” — Plato

“Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.” — William James

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Brahmana [*POEM*]

BRAHMANA *

by XANADU
He sits in high snows:
Mind calm, back straight,
Where the glacier glows.
‘Here I shall wait.’
Ah, bless the Brahmana!—
He has vanquished death,
Floats in nirvana
Near his last breath.
He has fought the good fight,
His race is run.
‘I go into Night,
Let day be done.’
In ice moons unharmed,
Sips air like wine:
Transhuman, transformed—
His eyes, how they shine!
Pure and possessionless
Naked in rain
Sacred in sinlessness
Perfect in pain.
* Brah(a)mana: An enlightened sage in Buddhist lore.
The qualities of a brahmana are described in detail
in Ch. 26 of the Buddhist classic, The Dhammapada.
The picture depicts the legendary Mahavatar Babaji,
born 2000 years ago at the time Christ, and claimed
by his devotees to be still alive in the High Himalayas.

The Vampire: A Poem by Charles Baudelaire *

Translated from the French
by Lasha Darkmoon

LD:   In August 1857, less than two months after Charles Baudelaire published Les Fleurs du Mal (‘The Flowers of Evil’), a French court banned six poems from its contents: Lesbos, Femmes damnés, Le Léthé, À celle qui est trop gaie, Les Bijoux, and Les Métamorphoses du Vampire. The poem below, though it also featured an erotic vampire, was so well written that the censors decided not to ban it;  though it was thought that it might have a corrupting effect on susceptible young men— if not women with lesbian tendencies. The femme fatale described in the poem was Baudelaire’s mistress, Jeanne Duval, an actress and dancer of mixed French and black African ancestry. A sex addict who frequently visited brothels, Baudelaire was completely bewitched by her. Here is a sketch of this temptress by Baudelaire.   Read More