Central Issue: We Are All Under Jewish Misrule

By JOHN KAMINSKI
16 November 2020

360-degree scan of a rotting civilization

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“The real war is between every country in the world and Israel … The central issue of human existence at the present time is that Jews have totally taken over reality … conspiring to turn the world into one giant Jewish run superstate.” — John Kaminski


Never has censorship in the United States been so in-your-face as now when the President can’t even post his comments on Twitter because they are ruled fake news by an unreconstructed Jewish Communist dupe. What hope to tell the truth does an ordinary blogger have? Read More

The Vampire: A Poem by Charles Baudelaire *

Translated from the French
by Lasha Darkmoon

LD:   In August 1857, less than two months after Charles Baudelaire published Les Fleurs du Mal (‘The Flowers of Evil’), a French court banned six poems from its contents: Lesbos, Femmes damnés, Le Léthé, À celle qui est trop gaie, Les Bijoux, and Les Métamorphoses du Vampire. The poem below, though it also featured an erotic vampire, was so well written that the censors decided not to ban it;  though it was thought that it might have a corrupting effect on susceptible young men— if not women with lesbian tendencies. The femme fatale described in the poem was Baudelaire’s mistress, Jeanne Duval, an actress and dancer of mixed French and black African ancestry. A sex addict who frequently visited brothels, Baudelaire was completely bewitched by her. Here is a sketch of this temptress by Baudelaire.   Read More

To Francesca, my praises: A Baudelaire Translation

This exquisite poem by Baudelaire was not written in French, as most of his poems are, but in Latin. It is influenced by the great Latin hymns of the Middle Ages, many of them written in rhyme. This translation (originally published here in October 2010) attempts to imitate the rhyme scheme and musicality of Baudelaire’s hymn to his sweetheart, an unknown young lady he worshipped from afar in the tradition of Dante and Petrarch.

Translated  by Lasha Darkmoon Read More

THE CAT: An ‘Erotic’ Poem by Charles Baudelaire *

Translated from the French
by Lasha Darkmoon

[LD] The poem is ostensibly about a cat.  In actual fact, it is about Baudelaire’s dusky mulatto mistress, Jeanne Duval,  a feline beauty with whom the French poet remained totally obsessed for roughly 20 years. He is said to have loved his half-French half-Haitian mistress more than any other woman in his life, apart from his mother who always came first. 

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Hymn to Satan: A Baudelaire Translation

Baudelaire is a symbol as well as a symptom of the human sickness. This is what happens to a man who has lost his spiritual bearings and expects to find an artificial paradise in drugs, sex and Satanism.  

By CHARLES BAUDELAIRE
Translated from the French
by Lasha Darkmoon

Hymn to Satan

O you among all angels consummate,
God stripped of honor, God betrayed by fate,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

O Prince of exiles, you who suffered wrong,
Who still undaunted rise up ever strong,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You, lord and master of the occult art,
Wise healer of the harrowed human heart,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You who, through love, beneath malignant skies,
Give lepers their first taste of paradise,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You who, in teaching girls to act like whores,
Bring them to rags and syphilitic sores,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You who, on a tall building’s outer ledge,
Propel the sleepwalker toward the edge,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You who, to soothe his soul, inspires man
To make the best gunpowder that he can,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

You who, with death, your darling in delusion,
Invented Hope—that beautiful illusion—
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

O refuge of all who in God’s angry eyes
Have failed the entrance test to paradise,
Satan, have pity on my long despair!

PRAYER

Glory and praise to thee, Satan on high
Who reigned in heaven once, yet vanquished lie
In deepest hell now—plunged in dreams and silence!
Grant that my soul rest one day in thy presence:
There where the Tree of Knowledge spreads its shade,
Building a brave new temple round your head.

Baudelaire’s ‘Hymn to Satan’, Two Translations

“La plus belle des ruses du diable
est de vous persuader qu’il n’existe pas.”

quote-the-devil-s-finest-trick-is-to-persuade-you-that-he-does-not-exist-charles-baudelaire-74-3-0311

EDITOR’S NOTE:  We offer below the French original of Baudelaire’s Les Litanies de Satan (‘Hymn to Satan’), followed by two translations of the poem, the first by William Aggeler and the second by Lasha Darkmoon. 

Skeptics who doubt the Devil’s real existence will obviously derive little satisfaction from reading a poem in praise of a non-existent person. They are therefore advised either to skip the poem and its translations, or, if they prefer, to display their intellectual superiority in the Comments section by poking fun at Baudelaire for his gullibility. Read More

Two Baudelaire translations in different styles

Baudelaire_crop

Left, portrait of French poet Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867)
Editor John Scott Montecristo: These two translations of Baudelaire’s sonnet Sépulture (‘Sepulchre’) illustrate the difference between an accurate, literal translation by William Aggeler and an “imitation translation” by Lasha Darkmoon.
The Aggeler version follows the original French poem closely, word for word. It can do this easily enough because it makes no attempt to capture the musicality of Baudelaire’s poem. By using free verse—i.e., chopped-up prose—Aggeler is prepared to sacrifice the sound effects of the original in order to obtain strict verbal accuracy.
The second version by Lasha Darkmoon does the opposite. Though less accurate verbally, it makes use of rhyme and metre, as Baudelaire himself does, to capture the rhythm and musicality of the original. For Darkmoon, sound takes precedence over sense.

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