Weird Universe: We Are Meant To Be Here (Part 2)

By Lasha Darkmoon
16 February 2020

PUBLISHED  ON  TRUTHSEEKER

In Part 1 of this essay (‘Weird Universe: Are We Meant To Be Here?”), I discussed the strange ideas of William Blake (1757-1827), England’s famous poet-painter and mystic. He had managed to combine his own wacky version of Christianity with an uninhibited tantric sexual mysticism that most of his contemporaries found ridiculous, if not repugnant, and which the subsequent age of Queen Victoria would regard with revulsion and horror. 

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Weird Universe: We Are Meant To Be Here. (Part 1)

By Lasha Darkmoon
9 February 2020

PUBLISHED ON TRUTHSEEKER

An excursion into the visionary worlds of Blake, Swedenborg, and Leonardo da Vinci. None of these great thinkers would have had any problems believing in a postmortem existence, given that they regarded death as a “continuation of life”.   

“The universe is not only stranger than we imagine,
it is stranger than we can imagine.” — Sir Arthur Eddington [1]

PART 1 : Weird Universe

Strange. Weird. Uncanny. Three sensational synonyms to lure us into the bizarre mind worlds of William Blake, Emanuel Swedenborg, and Leonardo da Vinci. Perhaps they will help us to appreciate Hamlet’s observation to his friend Horatio that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in our philosophy [2]. Read More

The Tyger, by William Blake

LD: William Blake’s The Tyger ( 1794)  is the most popular poem in the English language, anthologized more often than any other poem. Here are two different versions. I doubt if The Tyger  has ever been read so well—the first by a man, the second by a woman, both consummate artists of recitation with the most beautifully modulated voices.